amazon-competitors

Amazon Competitors

Amazon is a consumer e-commerce platform with a diversified business model spanning across e-commerce, cloud, advertising, streaming, and more. Over the years, Amazon acquired several companies. As it operates across several industries, Amazon has a wide range of competitors across each of those industries. For instance, Amazon E-commerce competes with Shopify, Wix, Google, Etsy, eBay, BigCommerce.

How to analyze a company with tentacles across many industries

Analyzing a company can be done from several perspectives. For a diversified business model, like Amazon, things can get even more complicated. Indeed, over the years, Amazon started with a simple use case (books), and it expanded in all directions on online commerce. At the same time, over the years, Amazon also bought several companies,

amazon-subsidiaries
Amazon is a consumer e-commerce platform with a diversified business model spanning across e-commerce, cloud, advertising, streaming, and more. Over the years Amazon acquired several companies. Among its 12 subsidiaries, Amazon has AbeBooks.com, Audible, CamiXology, Fabric.com, IMDb, PillPack, Shopbop, Souq.com, Twitch, Whole Foods Market, Woot! and Zappos.

Amazon expanded in several verticals, and for each vertical we can identify different competitors:

  • E-commerce (Amazon.com): Shopify, Wix, Google, Etsy, eBay, BigCommerce.
  • Physical retail (Whole Foods): Target, Walmart, BestBuy, The Home Depot, Costco, Walgreens, Kroger, Trader Joe’s.
  • Last-mile delivery: Flipkart, Instacart, Doordash.
  • Streaming (Prime): Netflix, Spotify, YouTube (Google), Disney+, Hulu, HBO.
  • Cloud (Amazon AWS): Microsoft, Google, IBM.
  • Digital advertising: Google, YouTube, Facebook (Instagram), Bing (Microsoft), Twitter, Pinterest.

We could expand farther the analysis, if we were to zoom further from the perspective of all the Amazon’s subsidiaries.

More on Amazon

how-does-amazon-make-money
Amazon has a diversified business model. Amazon’s primary revenue streams comprise its e-commerce platform, made of Amazon labeled products and Amazon third-party stores. In addition to that, Amazon makes money via third-party seller services (like fulfilled by Amazon), advertising on its platform, AWS cloud platform, and Prime membership.
amazon-business-model
Amazon has a diversified business model. In 2018 Amazon posted over $232 billion in revenues and over $10 billion in net profits. Online stores contributed to nearly 52% of Amazon revenues, followed by Physical Stores, Third-party Seller Services, Amazon AWS, Subscription Services, and Advertising revenues.
amazon-swot-analysis
Amazon is among the most diversified business model in the tech industry. The company is well-positioned to dominate e-commerce further. And while its online stores have tight profit margins, Amazon still unlocks cash for growth, while consolidating its dominance in the cloud and grabbing new opportunities like voice.
amazon-pestel-analysis
Amazon future success is influenced by Political (new regulations and potential breakups of the company), Economic (new global economic dynamics influencing e-commerce adoption), Social (changing consumer behavior at a global level), Technological (new technological challenges, like last-mile delivery at scale), Environmental (enabling sustainable operations), and Legal (compliance with international laws).

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Connected to Amazon Business Model

Amazon Business Model

amazon-business-model
Amazon has a diversified business model. In 2021 Amazon posted over $469 billion in revenues and over $33 billion in net profits. Online stores contributed to over 47% of Amazon revenues, Third-party Seller Services,  Amazon AWS, Subscription Services, Advertising revenues, and Physical Stores.

Amazon Mission Statement

amazon-vision-statement-mission-statement (1)
Amazon’s mission statement is to “serve consumers through online and physical stores and focus on selection, price, and convenience.” Amazon’s vision statement is “to be Earth’s most customer-centric company, where customers can find and discover anything they might want to buy online, and endeavors to offer its customers the lowest possible prices.” 

Customer Obsession

customer-obsession
In the Amazon Shareholders’ Letter for 2018, Jeff Bezos analyzed the Amazon business model, and it also focused on a few key lessons that Amazon as a company has learned over the years. These lessons are fundamental for any entrepreneur, of small or large organization to understand the pitfalls to avoid to run a successful company!

Amazon Revenues

amazon-revenue-model
Amazon has a business model with many moving parts. With the e-commerce platform which generated over $222 billion in 2021, followed by third-party stores services which generated over $103 billion, Amazon AWS, which generated over $62 billion, Amazon advertising which generated over $31 billion and Amazon Prime which also generated over $31 billion, and physical stores which generated over $17 billion.

Amazon Cash Conversion

cash-conversion-cycle-amazon

Working Backwards

working-backwards
The Amazon Working Backwards Method is a product development methodology that advocates building a product based on customer needs. The Amazon Working Backwards Method gained traction after notable Amazon employee Ian McAllister shared the company’s product development approach on Quora. McAllister noted that the method seeks “to work backwards from the customer, rather than starting with an idea for a product and trying to bolt customers onto it.”

Amazon Flywheel

amazon-flywheel
The Amazon Flywheel or Amazon Virtuous Cycle is a strategy that leverages on customer experience to drive traffic to the platform and third-party sellers. That improves the selections of goods, and Amazon further improves its cost structure so it can decrease prices which spins the flywheel.

Jeff Bezos Day One

jeff-bezos-day-1
In the letter to shareholders in 2016, Jeff Bezos addressed a topic he had been thinking quite profoundly in the last decades as he led Amazon: Day 1. As Jeff Bezos put it “Day 2 is stasis. Followed by irrelevance. Followed by excruciating, painful decline. Followed by death. And that is why it is always Day 1.”

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